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Maps of sensory space in different sensory modalities can, if brought into register, give rise to an amodal representation of space.

If sensory maps of uni-modal space are brought into register, then cues from different modalities can access shared maps of motor space.

Electrical stimulation of the cat SC can evoke saccades.

Typically, these saccades go into that general direction in which natural stimuli would lead to activation in the area that was electrically stimulated.

The `foveation hypothesis' states that the SC elicits saccades which foveate the stimuli activating it for further examination.

The motor map of in the dSC is retinotopic.

The superior colliculus is retinotopically organized.

Activity in the deep SC has been described as different regions competing for access to motor resources.

Electrostimulation of putamen neurons can evoke body movement consistent with the map of somatosensory space in that brain region.

The motor map is not monotonic across the entire FEF, but sites that are close to each other have similar characteristic saccades.

Stimulating cells in FEF whose activity is elevated before a saccade of a given direction and amplitude usually generates a saccade of that direction and amplitude.

Rearing barn owls in darkness results in mis-alignment of auditory and visual receptive fields in the owls' optic tectum.

Rearing barn owls in darkness results in discontinuities in the map of auditory space of the owls' optic tectum.

The size and direction of a saccade before which deep SC neurons show the greatest activity depends on where they are in the SC: Neurons in medial regions of the SC tend to prefer saccades going up, neurons in lateral regions of the SC tend to prefer saccades going down.

Long saccades are preceded by strong activity of rostral neurons, short saccades by activity of caudal neurons.

Deep SC neurons which have preferred saccades have these preferred saccades also in total darkness. They thus do not simply respond to the specific location of a visual stimulus.

The uni-sensory, multi-sensory and motor maps of the superior colliculus are in spatial register.

Neurons in the deep SC whose activity spikes before a saccade have preferred amplitudes and directions: Each of these neurons spikes strongest before a saccade with these properties and less strongly before different saccades.

The motmap algorithm uses reinforcement learning to organize behavior in a two-dimensional map.

Topographic maps have biological advantages.