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Sensory maps and their registration across modalities has been demonstrated in mice, cats, monkeys, guinea pigs, hamsters, barn owls, and iguanas.

How strongly SC neurons' development depends on experience (and how strongly well they are developed after birth) is different from species to species, so just because the superficial mouse SC is developed at birth, doesn't mean it is in other species (and I believe responsiveness in cats develops with experience).

Response properties of superficial SC neurons is different from those found in mouse V1 neurons.

Wickelgren found the receptive fields of audio-visual neurons in the deep SC to have no sharp boundaries.

SIV neurons are excited almost exclusively by somatosensory stimuli.

SIV neurons' activity can be inhibited by activity in the auditory FAES.

The function of SIV is unknown.

Dehner et al. speculate that the inhibitory influence of FAES activity on SIV activity is connected to modality-specific attention: According to that hypothesis, an auditory stimulus which leads to strong FAES activity will suppress activity in FAES and thus block out cortical somatosensory input to the SC.

In cats, the SC has a size of about 4.5 mm to 4.7 mm from the posterior to the anterior end and 6.0 mm to 6.2 mm from the medial to the lateral end.

The receptive fields of certain neurons in the cat's deep SC shift when the eye position is changed. Thus, the map of auditory space in the deep SC is temporarily realigned to stay in register with the retinotopic map.

Cats, being an altricial species, are born with little to no capability of multi-sensory integration and develop first multi-sensory SC neurons, then neurons exhibiting multi-sensory integration on the neural level only after birth.

(Some) SC neurons in the newborn cat are sensitive to tactile stimuli at birth, to auditory stimuli a few days postnatally, and to visual stimuli last.

Visual responsiveness develops in the cat first from top to bottom in the superficial layers, then, after a long pause, from top to bottom in the lower layers.

Overt visual function occurs only starting 2-3 weeks postnatally in cats.

Kao et al. did not find visually responsive neurons in the deep layers of the cat SC within the first three postnatal weeks.

Overt visual function can be observed in developing kittens at the same time or before visually responsive neurons can first be found in the deep SC.

There are marked differences in the receptive field properties of superficial cat and monkey SC neurons.