Show Reference: "Multisensory Integration in the Superior Colliculus of the Alert Cat"

Multisensory Integration in the Superior Colliculus of the Alert Cat Journal of Neurophysiology, Vol. 80, No. 2. (01 August 1998), pp. 1006-1010 by Mark T. Wallace, M. Alex Meredith, Barry E. Stein
@article{wallace-et-al-1998,
    abstract = {Wallace, Mark T., M. Alex Meredith, and Barry E. Stein. Multisensory integration in the superior colliculus of the alert cat. J. Neurophysiol. 80: 1006–1010, 1998. The modality convergence patterns, sensory response properties, and principles governing multisensory integration in the superior colliculus ({SC}) of the alert cat were found to have fundamental similarities to those in anesthetized animals. Of particular interest was the observation that, in a manner indistinguishable from the anesthetized animal, combinations of two different sensory stimuli significantly enhanced the responses of {SC} neurons above those evoked by either unimodal stimulus. These observations are consistent with the speculation that there is a functional link among multisensory integration in individual {SC} neurons and cross-modality attentive and orientation behaviors.},
    author = {Wallace, Mark T. and Meredith, M. Alex and Stein, Barry E.},
    day = {01},
    issn = {1522-1598},
    journal = {Journal of Neurophysiology},
    keywords = {biology, multisensory-integration, sc},
    month = aug,
    number = {2},
    pages = {1006--1010},
    pmid = {9705489},
    posted-at = {2013-11-07 09:48:58},
    priority = {2},
    publisher = {American Physiological Society},
    title = {Multisensory Integration in the Superior Colliculus of the Alert Cat},
    url = {http://jn.physiology.org/content/80/2/1006.abstract},
    volume = {80},
    year = {1998}
}

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Multisensory integration in the SC is similar in anesthetized and alert animals (cats).

Neural responses in the sc to spatially and temporally coincident cross-sensory stimuli can be much stronger than responses to uni-sensory stimuli.

In fact, they can be much greater than the sum of the responses to either stimulus alone.

Multisensory enhancement and depression are an increased and decreased response of a multisensory neuron to congruent and incongruent stimuli, respectively.

Enhancement is greatest for weak stimuli and least for strong stimuli. This is called inverse effectiveness.