Show Reference: "Multisensory integration: current issues from the perspective of the single neuron"

Multisensory integration: current issues from the perspective of the single neuron Nature Reviews Neuroscience, Vol. 9, No. 5. (May 2008), pp. 406-406, doi:10.1038/nrn2377 by Barry E. Stein, Terrence R. Stanford
@article{stein-and-stanford-2008,
    author = {Stein, Barry E. and Stanford, Terrence R.},
    doi = {10.1038/nrn2377},
    issn = {1471-003X},
    journal = {Nature Reviews Neuroscience},
    keywords = {aes, attention, multi-modality, rls, sc-input},
    month = april,
    number = {5},
    pages = {255-266},
    posted-at = {2011-09-23 16:37:03},
    priority = {2},
    publisher = {Nature Publishing Group},
    title = {Multisensory integration: current issues from the perspective of the single neuron},
    url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nrn2377},
    volume = {9},
    year = {2008}
}

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Multisensory enhancement and depression are an increased and decreased response of a multisensory neuron to congruent and incongruent stimuli, respectively.

Multisensory enhancement and depression are very different across neurons.

In many instances of multi-sensory perception, humans integrate information optimally.

Multisensory stimuli can be integrated within a certain time window; auditory or somatosensory stimuli can be integrated with visual stimuli even though they arrive delayed wrt. visual stimuli.

Enhancement is greatest for weak stimuli and least for strong stimuli. This is called inverse effectiveness.

Descending inputs from association cortex to SC are uni-sensory.

AES integrates audio-visual inputs similar to SC.

AES has multisensory neurons, but they do not project to SC.

AES is a brain region in the cat. We do not know if there is a homologue in humans.

Map alignment in the SC is expensive, but it pays off because it allows for a single interface between sensory processing and motor output generation.

Important regions in the posterior parietal cortex (PPC) are

  • LIP
  • MIP
  • VIP

LIP is retinotopic and involved in gaze shifts.

The medial intraparietal area (MIP) is retinotopic and involved in reaching.

Sensory re-mapping is often incomplete.

Non-spatial stimulus properties influence if and how cross-sensory stimuli are integrated.

Multisensory integration in cortical VLPFC was more commonly observed for face-vocalization combinations than for general audio-visual cues.