Show Reference: "The role of the superior colliculus in visually guided behavior"

The role of the superior colliculus in visually guided behavior Experimental Neurology, Vol. 11, No. 1. (January 1965), pp. 115-146, doi:10.1016/0014-4886(65)90026-9 by James M. Sprague, Thomas H. Meikle
@article{sprague-and-meikle-1965,
    author = {Sprague, James M. and Meikle, Thomas H.},
    citeulike-article-id = {13474078},
    citeulike-linkout-0 = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/0014-4886(65)90026-9},
    doi = {10.1016/0014-4886(65)90026-9},
    issn = {00144886},
    journal = {Experimental Neurology},
    keywords = {biology, motor, orienting, sc},
    month = jan,
    number = {1},
    pages = {115--146},
    posted-at = {2015-01-05 16:13:45},
    priority = {2},
    title = {The role of the superior colliculus in visually guided behavior},
    url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/0014-4886(65)90026-9},
    volume = {11},
    year = {1965}
}

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Lesions of the tectospinal tract leads to deficits in motor responses, while lesions of brachium and parts of the tectothalamic system produce contralateral visual neglect.

Ablation of the SC leads to temporary blindness and deficits in visual following.

Sprague and Meikle Jr. propose that the SC is involved in visual attention.

In the Sprague effect, removing (or deactivating) one visual cortex eliminates visually induced orienting behavior to stimuli in the contralateral hemifield.

Lesioning (or deactivating) the contralateral SC restores the orienting behavior.