Show Reference: "Size and distribution of movement fields in the monkey superior colliculus"

Size and distribution of movement fields in the monkey superior colliculus Brain Research, Vol. 113, No. 1. (August 1976), pp. 21-34, doi:10.1016/0006-8993(76)90003-2 by David L. Sparks, Richard Holland, Barton L. Guthrie
@article{sparks-et-al-1976,
    author = {Sparks, David L. and Holland, Richard and Guthrie, Barton L.},
    citeulike-article-id = {13473936},
    citeulike-linkout-0 = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/0006-8993(76)90003-2},
    doi = {10.1016/0006-8993(76)90003-2},
    issn = {00068993},
    journal = {Brain Research},
    keywords = {motor, sc},
    month = aug,
    number = {1},
    pages = {21--34},
    posted-at = {2015-01-05 10:59:18},
    priority = {2},
    title = {Size and distribution of movement fields in the monkey superior colliculus},
    url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/0006-8993(76)90003-2},
    volume = {113},
    year = {1976}
}

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Electrical stimulation of the cat SC can evoke saccades.

Typically, these saccades go into that general direction in which natural stimuli would lead to activation in the area that was electrically stimulated.

The `foveation hypothesis' states that the SC elicits saccades which foveate the stimuli activating it for further examination.

Certain neurons in the deep SC emit bursts of activity before making a saccade.