Show Reference: "Spatial factors determine the activity of multisensory neurons in cat superior colliculus"

Spatial factors determine the activity of multisensory neurons in cat superior colliculus Brain Research, Vol. 365, No. 2. (February 1986), pp. 350-354, doi:10.1016/0006-8993(86)91648-3 by Alex M. Meredith, Barry E. Stein
@article{meredith-and-stein-1986,
    abstract = {The responses of a neuron to stimuli from one sensory modality can be profoundly influenced by inputs from other sensory modalities. The present experiments demonstrate that the nature and the magnitude of these multisensory interactions depend on the positions of the stimuli in relation to their respective receptive fields. The spatial rules governing these interactions underscore the significance of the alignment of sensory maps in the brain.},
    author = {Meredith, Alex M. and Stein, Barry E.},
    doi = {10.1016/0006-8993(86)91648-3},
    issn = {00068993},
    journal = {Brain Research},
    keywords = {biology, multisensory-integration, sc, spatial-principle},
    month = feb,
    number = {2},
    pages = {350--354},
    posted-at = {2013-07-15 17:48:14},
    priority = {2},
    title = {Spatial factors determine the activity of multisensory neurons in cat superior colliculus},
    url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/0006-8993(86)91648-3},
    volume = {365},
    year = {1986}
}

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Neural responses in the sc to spatially and temporally coincident cross-sensory stimuli can be much stronger than responses to uni-sensory stimuli.

In fact, they can be much greater than the sum of the responses to either stimulus alone.

Neural responses (in multi-sensory neurons) in the sc to spatially disparate cross-sensory stimuli is usually weaker than responses to uni-sensory stimuli.

Responses in multi-sensory neurons in the SC follow the so-called spatial principle.

Visual receptive fields in the sc usually consist of an excitatory central region and an inhibitory surround.

(Auditory receptive fields also often seem to show this antagonism.)