Show Reference: "Anatomical Features of the Intrinsic Circuitry Underlying Multisensory Integration in the Superior Colliculus"

Anatomical Features of the Intrinsic Circuitry Underlying Multisensory Integration in the Superior Colliculus In The New Handbook of Multisensory Processing (1 June 2012), pp. 31-47 by John G. McHaffie, Veronica Fuentes-Sanatamaria, Juan C. Alvarado, et al. edited by Barry E. Stein
@incollection{mchaffie-et-al-2012,
    address = {Cambridge, MA, USA},
    author = {McHaffie, John G. and Fuentes-Sanatamaria, Veronica and Alvarado, Juan C. and Fuentes Far\'{\i}as, Alma L. and Guti\'{e}rrez-Ospina, Gabriel and Stein, Barry E.},
    booktitle = {The New Handbook of Multisensory Processing},
    chapter = {2},
    day = {1},
    editor = {Stein, Barry E.},
    isbn = {0262017121},
    keywords = {biology, integration, sc},
    month = jun,
    pages = {31--47},
    posted-at = {2012-10-22 11:14:11},
    priority = {2},
    publisher = {The MIT Press},
    title = {Anatomical Features of the Intrinsic Circuitry Underlying Multisensory Integration in the Superior Colliculus},
    year = {2012}
}

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Multi-sensory neurons in the SC are only in the intermediate and deep layers.

The most important cortical input to the SC (in cats) comes from layer V cortical neurons from a number of sub-regions of the anterior ectosylvian sulcus (AES):

  • anterior ectosylvian visual area (AEV)
  • the auditory field of AES (FAES)
  • and the fourth somatosensory area (SIV)

These populations in themselves are uni-sensory.

Neurons that receive auditory and visual ascending input also receive (only) auditory and visual descending projections.

Most multisensory SC neurons project to brainstem and spinal chord.

There are monosynaptic excitatory AES-SC projections and McHaffie et al. state that "the predominant effect of AES on SC multisensory neurons is excitatory."