Show Reference: "A role for the superior colliculus in the modulation of threat responsiveness in primates: toward the ontogenesis of the social brain"

A role for the superior colliculus in the modulation of threat responsiveness in primates: toward the ontogenesis of the social brain Reviews in the Neurosciences, Vol. 23, No. 5-6. (2012), pp. 697-706, doi:10.1515/revneuro-2012-0055 by Rafael S. Maior, Etsuro Hori, Carlos E. Uribe, et al.
@article{maior-et-al-2012,
    abstract = {Defense and social mechanisms in primates seem to share, at least in infancy, common neural {substrata.Among} these, recent research has implicated the primate superior colliculus ({SC}) on tasks involving visual detection and recognition of threatening stimuli, such as snakes and faces with emotional expressions. There is also evidence that both kinds of stimuli share specific characteristics and command special attention in the primate visual system. The present review focuses on the role of the {SC} in these seemingly overlapping {functions.We} present social behavioral data from capuchin monkeys in which the bilateral lesion of the {SC} induced a transitory impairment of social behaviors. The findings presented here are compared with previous studies, our own and others, on social behaviors and threat detection. We argue that, although the {SC} may participate in both systems,its role is more prominent in the detection/recognition of threat. Social interactions more likely depend on larger and more complex neural systems, where the {SC} may play a key role in early infancy. The implications of these recent findings are discussed under an evolutionary perspective.},
    author = {Maior, Rafael S. and Hori, Etsuro and Uribe, Carlos E. and Saletti, Patricia G. and Ono, Taketoshi and Nishijo, Hisao and Tomaz, Carlos},
    doi = {10.1515/revneuro-2012-0055},
    issn = {0334-1763},
    journal = {Reviews in the Neurosciences},
    keywords = {amygdala, biology, face-detection, fear, sc, visual-processing},
    number = {5-6},
    pages = {697--706},
    pmid = {23001312},
    posted-at = {2013-08-23 08:54:55},
    priority = {2},
    title = {A role for the superior colliculus in the modulation of threat responsiveness in primates: toward the ontogenesis of the social brain},
    url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1515/revneuro-2012-0055},
    volume = {23},
    year = {2012}
}

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The SC has been suggested to be involved in social interaction.

Newborn children prefer to look at faces and face-like visual stimuli.

Visual cortex is not fully developed at birth in primates.

The fact that visual cortex is not fully developed at birth, but newborn children prefer face-like visual stimuli to other visual stimuli could be explained by the presence of a subcortical face-detector.

Visual processing of potentially affective stimuli seems to be partially innate in primates.

The pulvinar receives direct retinal input.