Show Reference: "Development of Multisensory Processing and the Role of Early Experience"

Development of Multisensory Processing and the Role of Early Experience In The New Handbook of Multisensory Processing (1 June 2012) by David J. Lewkowicz, Brigitte Röder edited by Barry E. Stein
@incollection{lewkowicz-and-roeder-2012,
    address = {Cambridge, MA, USA},
    author = {Lewkowicz, David J. and R\"{o}der, Brigitte},
    booktitle = {The New Handbook of Multisensory Processing},
    chapter = {34},
    day = {1},
    edition = {589},
    editor = {Stein, Barry E.},
    keywords = {biology, development, multisensory-integration},
    month = jun,
    posted-at = {2012-12-10 09:04:52},
    priority = {2},
    publisher = {The MIT Press},
    title = {Development of Multisensory Processing and the Role of Early Experience},
    year = {2012}
}

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Multisensory integration is present in neonates to some degree depending on species (more in precocial than in altricial species), but it is subject to postnatal development and then influenced by experience.

In some instances, developing animals lose perceptual capabilities instead of gaining them due to what is called perceptual narrowing or canalization. One example are human neonates who are able to discriminate human and monkey faces at first, but only human faces later in development.