Show Reference: "Neuron-specific contribution of the superior colliculus to overt and covert shifts of attention"

Neuron-specific contribution of the superior colliculus to overt and covert shifts of attention. Nature neuroscience, Vol. 7, No. 1. (21 January 2004), pp. 56-64, doi:10.1038/nn1169 by Alla Ignashchenkova, Peter W. Dicke, Thomas Haarmeier, Peter Thier
@article{ignashchenkova-et-al-2004,
    abstract = {The analysis of a peripheral visual location can be improved in two ways: either by orienting one's gaze (usually by making a foveating saccade) or by 'covertly' shifting one's attention to the peripheral location without making an eye movement. The premotor theory of attention holds that saccades and spatial shifts of attention share a common functional module with a distinct neuronal basis. Using single-unit recording from the brains of trained rhesus monkeys, we investigated whether the superior colliculus, the major subcortical center for the control of saccades, is part of this shared network for attention and saccades. Here we show that a distinct type of neuron in the intermediate layer of the superior colliculus, the visuomotor neuron, which is known to be centrally involved in the preparation of saccades, is also active during covert shifts of attention.},
    author = {Ignashchenkova, Alla and Dicke, Peter W. and Haarmeier, Thomas and Thier, Peter},
    citeulike-article-id = {3503609},
    citeulike-linkout-0 = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nn1169},
    citeulike-linkout-1 = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nn1169},
    citeulike-linkout-2 = {http://view.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14699418},
    citeulike-linkout-3 = {http://www.hubmed.org/display.cgi?uids=14699418},
    day = {21},
    doi = {10.1038/nn1169},
    issn = {1097-6256},
    journal = {Nature neuroscience},
    keywords = {attention, biology, motor, sc},
    month = jan,
    number = {1},
    pages = {56--64},
    pmid = {14699418},
    posted-at = {2014-09-26 14:56:37},
    priority = {2},
    publisher = {Nature Publishing Group},
    title = {Neuron-specific contribution of the superior colliculus to overt and covert shifts of attention},
    url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nn1169},
    volume = {7},
    year = {2004}
}

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There is a theory called the `premotor theory of visual attention' which posits that activity that can ultimately lead to a saccade can also facilitate processing of stimuli in those places the saccade will/would go to.

Spatial attention can enhance the activity of SC neurons whose receptive fields overlap the attended region