Show Reference: "The World as a Process: Simulations in the Natural and Social Science"

The World as a Process: Simulations in the Natural and Social Science In Modelling and Simulation in the Social Sciences from the Philosophy of Science Point of View (1996), pp. 77-100 by Stephan Hartmann edited by Rainer Hegselmann, Ulrich Mueller, Klaus G. Troitzsch
@article{hartmann-1996,
    author = {Hartmann, Stephan},
    booktitle = {Modelling and Simulation in the Social Sciences from the Philosophy of Science Point of View},
    editor = {Hegselmann, Rainer and Mueller, Ulrich and Troitzsch, Klaus G.},
    isbn = {9780792341253},
    keywords = {research, science, simulation},
    location = {Dordrecht},
    pages = {77--100},
    posted-at = {2014-01-06 11:31:57},
    priority = {2},
    publisher = {Kluwer},
    title = {The World as a Process: Simulations in the Natural and Social Science},
    year = {1996}
}

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According to Hartmann,

``A model is called dynamic, if it... includes assumptions about the time-evolution of the system. ... Simulations are closely related to dynamic models. More concretely, a simulation results when the equations of the underlying dynamic model are solved. This model is designed to imitate the time evolution of a real system. To put it another way, a simulation imitates one process by another process. In this definition, the term `process’ refers solely to some object or system whose state changes in time. If the simulation is run on a computer, it is called a computer simulation.''

According to Humphreys, Hartmann's definition of a simulation needs revision, but is basically correct.

In Humphreys' view, simulations need not include evolution over time.