Show Reference: "Temporal ventriloquism: crossmodal interaction on the time dimension: 2. Evidence from sensorimotor synchronization"

Temporal ventriloquism: crossmodal interaction on the time dimension: 2. Evidence from sensorimotor synchronization International Journal of Psychophysiology, Vol. 50, No. 1-2. (October 2003), pp. 157-163, doi:10.1016/s0167-8760(03)00131-4 by Gisa Aschersleben, Paul Bertelson
@article{aschersleben-and-bertelson-2003,
    author = {Aschersleben, Gisa and Bertelson, Paul},
    citeulike-article-id = {13495763},
    citeulike-linkout-0 = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/s0167-8760(03)00131-4},
    doi = {10.1016/s0167-8760(03)00131-4},
    issn = {01678760},
    journal = {International Journal of Psychophysiology},
    keywords = {biology, illusion, time, ventriloquism-effect},
    month = oct,
    number = {1-2},
    pages = {157--163},
    posted-at = {2015-01-19 15:38:26},
    priority = {2},
    title = {Temporal ventriloquism: crossmodal interaction on the time dimension: 2. {E}vidence from sensorimotor synchronization},
    url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/s0167-8760(03)00131-4},
    volume = {50},
    year = {2003}
}

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An auditory and a visual stimulus, separated in time, may be perceived as one audio-visual stimulus, seemingly occurring at the same point in time.

In a sensorimotor synchronization task, Aschersleben and Bertelson found that an auditory distractor biased the temporal perception of a visual target stimulus more strongly than the other way around.